WE MATTER, SO STOP THE LITTER

Since we say we matter, why do we allow so much litter in communities of non-European descent on a local and global level. 2013 the Black Lives Matter Movement was sparked by three women’s expression and action of many others symbolizing disgust with the United States judicial system and acquittal of a man who killed an unarmed teenager.   People of varying ethnicities are fed up with police brutality perpetrated mainly on descendants of melanoid and indigenous people, yet the same rage and frustration is not expressed or demonstrated when it comes to the disrespect of the environment in those same communities.  

 

The creator of this project grew up in the Boogie Down Bronx, which in some areas is still a clean pristine environment.  During her youth during the 70’s and early 80’s, the all over the northeast part of the Bronx community elders made sure the young people respected it, unlike the South Bronx that went by the derogatory term “Fort Apache”.  Dilapidated buildings, broken glass, litter, old broken toilets and other hazardous toxic materials sprawled all over the streets while children played around and on top of the rubbish.

 

Presently, much of the South Bronx has had a face lift and parts of uptown in the Bronx have taken on that mindset of desecrating the cosmetics of the community.

 

That behavior exists on an international level too just like the Sunnyside and Third Ward historical communities and other places throughout Houston, Texas.  Parts of Africa, the Caribbean, and Melanin Dominant/Indigenous communities all throughout North, Central, and South America that are in extreme contrast from neighborhoods of non-European descent. 

 

WHEW’s primary issues that this project seeks to address are the following:

 

  1. Environmental racism

  2. Poor city planning

  3. Self-inflicted display of self-hatred 

  4. Shifting mindsets and behaviors

  5. Cleaning and beautifying communities

  6. Creating monetary opportunities to begin the process and maintain the communities’ cosmetic changes